Guaranteed Analysis

Last November, we completed the last of the requirements for Guaranteed Analysis of our products. All pet food labels require a guaranteed analysis on the label to advise the purchaser of the product’s nutrient content. The only exception is for products that do not and are not intended to provide protein, fat or fiber (for example, vitamin and mineral supplements), in which case the product is exempt from guarantees for those components. Previously, Washington State had not required this of treat manufacturers. However, we are now proud labelers of our own GA stickers and holder of all the documentation that the independent laboratory produced for us. 140130-GA stciker

Look for this label to know that the moisture, fiber, fat and protein are guaranteed on every Bunny Biscotti you feed your furry one.

Guaranteed Analysis here we come!

Ten pounds of Bunny Biscotti all packaged up and ready to be shipped for Guaranteed Analysis. Soon we’ll be labeling all of our products with Fiber, Fat, Protein and Moisture. Thank the Bunny on the Moon we did not have to actually form each for testing, and could simply send in bulk bags!

Being the only treat on the market made with whole hay and no added sugars, fats, or animal products, we are expecting to knock it out of the ballpark in the Fiber category.

Packed up and ready for guarantee analysis!
Packed up and ready for guarantee analysis!

Bunfectionary now at Pioneer Pet Feed and Supply

UPDATE: No longer available here.

Bunfectionary products are now at Pioneer Pet Feed and Supply in Seattle’s Pioneer Square. Located at 87 & 1/2 South Washington Street, Seattle’s only vintage pet supply store. It may been the first fire-roof building after the Great Seattle Fire.  Proprietor David sources great local and natural products from treats and feed to adorable catnip filled burlap “animals” printed with veggie dyes.

 

Rabbits, Moon, Grass, and Clouds: symbols of Japanese Autumn

furoshiki-moon-rabbit-tsuki-usagi2

Last Autumn, we attended a little lecture on the Japanese tea ceremony and the Four Seasonal Icons of Japanese autumn culture – “Mangetsu (full moon), Oborozuki (moon obscured by clouds), Susuki (autumn grass), and of course, Usagi (rabbits). We learned why rabbits and autumn grass are paired and why the moon hides behind clouds in so many images of autumn, just as we Westerners will depict Autumn with dried corn, falling leaves, a pumpkin, or turkey.

At the tea ceremony, we were even given a sweet shaped like a rabbit.

Mochi bunny for autumn moon viewing tea ceremony
Mochi bunny for autumn moon viewing tea ceremony

Long blog short, the grass produces the seed heads at about the same time as the full moon, clouds are common at the time but also serve as a means of enhancing the fullness and brightness of the moon. The rabbit, meanwhile, is seen on the moon itself in many cultures, including Asian, indigenous Latin American, and native Pacific Northwest tribes.  In Japanese culture, the rabbit pounds rice into mochi.

Rabbit pounds mochi
Rabbit pounds mochi

The Japanese celebrate this full autumn moon much as we have Harvest Moon parties. Not surprisingly, the festival tend to be hundreds of years old and much more zen.

Tsukimi or Otsukimi, literally moon-viewing, refers to Japanese festivals honoring the autumn moon. The celebration of the full moon typically takes place on the 15th day of the eighth month of the traditional Japanese lunisolar calendar; the waxing moon is celebrated on the 13th day of the ninth month. These days normally fall in September and October of the modern solar calendar.

The tradition dates to the Heian era, and is now so popular in Japan that some people repeat the activities for several evenings following the appearance of the full moon during the eighth lunisolar month.

Tsukimi traditions include displaying decorations made from Japanese pampas grass (susuki) and eating rice dumplings called Tsukimi dango in order to celebrate the beauty of the moon. Seasonal produce are also displayed as offerings to the moon. Sweet potatoes are offered to the full moon, while beans or chestnuts are offered to the waxing moon the following month. The alternate names of the celebrations, Imomeigetsu (literally “potato harvest moon”) and Mamemeigetsu (“bean harvest moon”) or Kurimeigetsu (“chestnut harvest moon”) are derived from these offerings.

Tsukimi refers to the Japanese tradition of holding parties to view the harvest moon. The custom is thought to have originated with Japanese aristocrats during theHeian period, who would gather to recite poetry under the full moon of the eighth month of the lunisolar calendar, known as the “Mid-Autumn Moon.” Since ancient times, Japanese people have described the eighth lunisolar month (corresponding to September on the contemporary Gregorian calendar) as the best time for looking at the moon, since the relative positions of the earth, sun, and moon cause the moon to appear especially bright. On the evening of the full moon, it is traditional to gather in a place where the moon can be seen clearly, decorate the scene with Japanese pampas grass, and to serve white rice dumplings (known as Tsukimi dango), taro, edamame, chestnuts and other seasonal foods, plus sake as offerings to the moon in order to pray for an abundant harvest. These dishes are known collectively as Tsukimi dishes (???? tsukimi ry?ri)

As International Rabbit Day (4th Saturday of September) falls so close to the same period, we would like to get bunny lovers better acquainted with this fascinating celebration.

Rhubarb

Tilbert is named for Seattle Tilth, a once great organization that used to simply promote urban gardening and stewardship. Unfortunately, its priorities shifted as it decided to “grow its mission”, and now it has joined the hipster bandwagon of promoting the raising of animals in your yard as meat. And of course, this includes rabbits because some whack job convinced them that rabbits are low cost and low maintenance, needing just leftovers from a garden. No mention of hay, sociability, companionship, or the fact that many domesticated rabbits can’t survive outside.

Needless to say, we stopped our donations not only to the ST, but to the radio show that featured their outreach member.

But one of the good things we learned from them is that one of the best fertilizers is rabbit poop. It not only can go into the compost bin, but it can actually be spread directly on plants. And guess what plant loves bunny poop? Rhubarb.

So we planted a few plants on our roof deck, and fertilize all year with stray pellets. When Food 52 came produced this group of recipes, we had to share it.

In particular, these two caught our eyes.

Rhubarb and Rose Ramos Gin Fizz

Serves 1

  • 2 ounces London dry gin
  • 1/2 ounce lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce lime juice
  • 2 ounces rhubarb syrup
  • 1 ounce heavy cream
  • 1 or 2 drops rosewater
  • 1 egg white
  • ice
  • soda water
  1. Combine all ingredients except ice and soda in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 30 seconds. Then add ice to shaker and shake a further 30 seconds. Strain into a tall chilled glass and top up with soda.
  2. To make rhubarb syrup, cut a pound of rhubarb stalks into one-inch pieces, wrap them in cheesecloth, and simmer for a half hour in 2 C water and 1 C sugar. Strain into a glass container with a lid and refrigerate.

food52_06-12-12-6049

Naughty Rhubarb Scones

Serves 12-16 scones

  • 3 stalks rhubarb
  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup vanilla sugar
  • 2/3–3/4 cups heavy cream
  1. Preheat oven to 425.
  2. Slice rhubarb stalks 1/4 ” thick. Toss with 3 tablespoons of the sugar.
  3. Sift flour, baking powder and salt together in large bowl or bowl of food processor.
  4. Cut butter into flour mixture by hand (or whiz with food processor) until butter is the size of small peas.
  5. Blend in 1/4 cup of the sugar.
  6. Blend in sliced rhubarb. (If using the food processor, just pulse — you want the slices left mostly intact.)
  7. Blend in cream until a soft dough forms. (note: you may need to add more than 2/3 cup depending on the weather,etc.)
  8. Transfer dough to floured surface and divide in half. To make triangular scones, flatten into 6-inch disks and cut each circle into 6-8 scones. Sprinkle with remaining sugar.
  9. Arrange on ungreased cookie sheet and bake about 20 minutes or until reddish-brown on top.

food52_05-22-12-2-50

 

Find more here

Is Organic Better? Ask a Fruit Fly

The NY Times featured an article today about the effects of organic produce on fruit flies v conventional produce on fruit flies.

When Ria Chhabra, a middle school student near Dallas, heard her parents arguing about the value of organic foods, she was inspired to create a science fair project to try to resolve the debate.

Three years later, Ria’s exploration of fruit flies and organic foods has not only raised some provocative questions about the health benefits of organic eating, it has also earned the 16-year-old top honors in a national science competition, publication in a respected scientific journal and university laboratory privileges normally reserved for graduate students.

Photo Researchers
Ria Chhabra stands in front of her project.Courtesy of Ria ChhabraRia Chhabra stands in front of her project.

The research, titled “Organically Grown Food Provides Health Benefits toDrosophila melanogaster,” tracked the effects of organic and conventional diets on the health of fruit flies. By nearly every measure, including fertility, stress resistance and longevity, flies that fed on organic bananas and potatoes fared better than those who dined on conventionally raised produce.

Read more here.

 

Frosted Biscotti

Our “frosted” biscotti are now available at Bunny Bytes. Banana Bunny Biscotti is frosted with a puree of carrot, beet, or parsley in our new flower shape. Our testers seem to prefer this shape as it is easier to grab and run–talking to you Tilbert, Flower and Buttercup!

 

Fennel returns

Fennel is back!

Fennel Fronds

Did you know that the word fennel comes from the Latin word feniculum or foeniculum, meaning “little hay”? Is it any wonder that bunnies go crazy for it? Fennel can be incredibly sweet as well, especially Sweet Florence Fennel, often found in markets. Flavors range from the ubiquitous licorice or anise with lovely undertones of citrus such as lemon, orange, and tangerine.

Although it is known for stimulating appetite, from ancient time it has been known to help flatulence as found in this Latin phrase “semen foeniculi pellit spiracula culi,” which literally means “the fennel seeds make blow the arsehole” (or at least says Wikipedia).

All parts of the fennel plant are edible, from the big white root bulb to the stalk, fronds, seeds and its highly-sought pollen. Bunfectionary’s tasting team love the sweet anise flavor of the fronds with a light lemony undertone, and the stalks make tasty chew toys.



Macs in a box

Introducing our new gift box of Bunny Biscotti Banana Macarons. Each sliding box opens to reveal a dozen colorful macarons, dyed with our own fruit and vegetable pulp dyes. These are a perfect gift for not just that special bunny or Guinea pig, but for special people with bunnies in their lives. They also would make an exceptional host/ess gift for a bunny lover. Bring these instead of that flabby chardonnay, and be the hit of the party!

Bunny Biscotti in the gift box
One dozen delicious Banana Bunny Biscotti Macarons, made with hay, pumpkin, banana, romaine, banana and vanilla extracts, and xanthan gum (a natural binder).
Bunny Biscotti Hay Treats, Banana Macarons with (top) beet, spinach, carrot, and blueberry

 

These will be available August 1, directly from Bunfectionary.

In the mountains at Mountain Aire Mercantile

UPDATE: New owners and merchandising. No longer available at this location

When we are not playing serf to our long-eared overlords, we run a small architecture business, specializing in residential and commercial design. We were approached last year to improve a space for a coffee shop/grocery store. The owners decided on a DIY approach, but we are happy to report that they opened, and are now carrying Bunny Biscotti!

If you are heading to Mount Rainier for some hiking, camping or outdoor fun, stop by Mountain Aire Mercantile for some coffee, provisions, music, and of course, Bunny Biscotti for your bun friends. And don’t forget that other herbivores love them as well–try some for your horses and goats, or pick up a bag for a unique host/ess gift when visiting a friend with  hay-eating friends.

Natural Foods Grocery of Mountain Aire Mercantile