Triangle Rabbits of North Carolina Now Stocking Bunny Biscotti

The smart bunnies of the Research Triangle did their research and decided they want Bunny Biscotti Hay Treats! Triangle Rabbits of central North Carolina now sells Bunny Biscotti at their events. They sold out at the first event before we even had a chance to post this.

We had to revise our labels to meet the North Carolina State Agriculture standards, so be on the look out for the new look as it rolls out. Below is the label for our treats with apples (Washington, of course!) and blueberries.

180227-blue fr

They currently stock the Banana treats and the Apple with Blueberries treats.

Find Triangle Rabbits at  Facebook, MeetUp, and Twitter.

Website hacked

Nov 4, 2017

We apologize for the lack of new content, and some very old items. Our site was hacked and it has taken us a bit of time to slowly bring it all back. But find up to date info, and the latest pictures of our testing team on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We love Instagram–just bunnies and more bunnies (and a few vintage Mustangs).

 

Heart Beet returns

The original Heart Beet shape returns! Officially known as Beet and Mint, this deep red Bunny Biscotti was originally named Heart Beet and came in a heart shape. We will be returning to this shape for this flavor for the sole reason that it is darn cute to watch a bunny runs away with a heart in its mouth.

Heart Beet Bunny Biscotti
Heart Beet Bunny Biscotti

Bunny-Palooza 2016

Bunfectionary will be at Bunny-Palooza again this year in Hillsboro, OR. Rabbit Advocates has  put together its second festival of the bunnies at the same location outside of Portland, OR.

Saturday, November 5, 2016
10:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Washington County Fairgrounds
Cloverleaf Building
802 NE 28th Avenue
Hillsboro, OR 97124

We will have all the favorite Bunny Biscotti flavors: Carrot & Fennel, Carrot & Raisin, Banana, Floral Bouquet, Pineapple & Mint, Beet & Mint, and our four berry and apple flavors: Strawberry & Mint, Blackberry & Mint, Cranberry & Mint, and Blueberry & Mint. We also will have double the number of the popular Variety Boxes that we had last year.

You can read a bit more about Bunfectionary in the Rabbit Advocates’ Spring 2016 newsletter.

Be sure to introduce yourself!

New packaging for freshness and safety and good looks!

Resealable Bunny Biscotti stand up pouch
Resealable Bunny Biscotti stand up pouch

Bunfectionary introduced new packaging for Bunny Biscotti last year at the Midwest Bunfest. The new packaging comprises an outer layer of richly-textured green rice paper, a PET layer, a LLDPE layer, a ziplock closure and tear notch, and a horizontal window so that customers can see the product before purchase. The package also has a gusset that allows it to stand up, and a hold can be punched above the heat seal line for hanging.

The rice paper helps protect the colors of the fruits and herbs from UV fading and discoloration, as well giving the pouch a unique texture and appearance.

Each package is heat sealed for fresh, long-lasting flavor and safety, and carries a Guaranteed Analysis Label.

Here is how we have changed over the past years.

viva Bunny Biscotti, aka Patent #9023409B2

On May 5, 2015, we celebrated the US Patent Office granting the patent for Bunny Biscotti. Bunny Biscotti is the first and only non grain, vegan treat for herbivores. Unlike other treats, it does not depend on glutens or other starches or sugars to bind it together. Nor does it depend on animal products like meat, eggs or yogurt.

It seems like ages ago since we devoured a package of rabbit treats after a late night party, and we realized that humans should not be able to eat bunny treats and vice versa.

Many thanks to all of you for your support, and special big hugs to our testers, Jenny at Bunny Bytes, Jason Stone, Cooley, to Tilbert and my gluten-intolerant friend for the inspiration. And of course, to our wonderful retailers, without whose trust and support this venture would never have survived.

Georgia House Rabbit Society to carry Bunny Biscotti

We are so happy to announce that Georgia House Rabbit Society will be carrying Bunny Biscotti. We first came across them when they had issues with land zoning and their new shelter–and won! Now they are trying to renovate their shelter with the help of animalhouse.tv, which is a television show concept that will renovate or build animal shelters in struggling communities. GA HRS has been chosen to be one of the first six episodes of this reality concept show. “The show is modeled after the reality show “Extreme Makeover, Home Edition “and the plan is they will come in and give [the] Rabbit Center a much needed remodel, expansion and other perks,  however the most important thing is the National spotlight that will happen for rescued rabbits!”

Bunny Biscotti gets its own identity

Sometimes a professional strong arms eyes you into seeing what you have been trying to avoid. In our case, our graphic designer showed us what we have been missing with the Bunny Biscotti label: a unified look that sets the product from the brand, and allows for differentiation between each product and flavor. She proposed a new label to replace the two labels, balancing the elements and in better proportion to the bag itself.

Previous labels were not in proportion to one another or the bag.
Previous labels were not in proportion to one another or the bag.

 

New label unifies the information of the two labels
New label unifies the information of the two labels

The new label uses a classically-styled font, Trajan, conveys steadfastness and yet with a modern look as well as capturing the idea of the sharp edges of the hay blades.

Single label is in better proportion and shows more product.
Single label is in better proportion and shows more product. (And I have no idea why WordPress is making the image so green.)

In the new packaging, the two labels are not competing against one another for your eye. And although the bag above shows a 1oz bag, and not the 2oz bag, so much more of the product is visible. In addition to the Bunny Biscotti Original label, we will be introducing a new label for the Bunny Biscotti Macarons, and the upcoming Bunny Biscotti Sampler boxes.

HRS Conference

hrs-stlouis-conf

 

Bunfectionary will be at the House Rabbit Society Educators Conference in St Louis, September 26-28. This is our first rabbit conference, and our first time sponsoring. We’ll have bags of rabbit treats–our signature Bunny Biscotti–for sale as well as some new ones, with proceeds to benefit the House Rabbit Society.

Washing veggies in hot water helps preserve them?

I admit it: I am still trying to wrap my head around this. How can hot water help preserve the raw veggies on my bunnies’ plates? I hate seeing how much can go to waste if I have to feed the guys a lot more than usual (e.g., leaving the house for more than 18 hours). Lettuce wilts and sticks to the plate, the carrots get mushy, and the fennel browns and hardens. So it was exciting to find this idea at the Modernist Cuisine site.

Food scientists, however, have discovered a remarkably effective way to extend the life of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables by days or even a week. It doesn’t involve the chlorine solutions, irradiation or peroxide baths sometimes used by produce packagers. And it’s easily done in any home by anyone.

This method, called heat-shocking, is 100 percent organic and uses just one ingredient that every cook has handy – hot water.

You may already be familiar with a related technique called blanching, a cooking method in which food is briefly dunked in boiling or very hot water. Blanching can extend the shelf life of broccoli and other plant foods, and it effectively reduces contamination by germs on the surface of the food. But blanching usually ruptures the cell walls of plants, causing color and nutrients to leach out. It also robs delicate produce of its raw taste.

Heat-shocking works differently. When the water is warm but not scalding – temperatures ranging from 105 F to 140 F (about 40 C to 60 C) work well for most fruits and vegetables – a brief plunge won’t rupture the cells. Rather, the right amount of heat alters the biochemistry of the tissue in ways that, for many kinds of produce, firm the flesh, delay browning and fading, slow wilting, and increase mold resistance.

A long list of scientific studies published during the past 15 years report success using heat-shocking to firm potatoes, tomatoes, carrots, and strawberries; to preserve the color of asparagus, broccoli, green beans, kiwi fruits, celery, and lettuce; to fend off overripe flavors in cantaloupe and other melons; and to generally add to the longevity of grapes, plums, bean sprouts and peaches, among others.

The optimum time and temperature combination for the quick dip seems to depend on many factors, but the procedure is quite simple. Just let the water run from your tap until it gets hot, then fill a large pot of water about two-thirds full, and use a thermometer to measure the temperature. It will probably be between 105 F and 140 F; if not, a few minutes on the stove should do the trick. Submerge the produce and hold it there for several minutes (the hotter the water, the less time is needed), then drain, dry and refrigerate as you normally would.

Researchers still are working out the details of how heat-shocking works, but it appears to change the food in several ways at once. Many of the fruits and vegetables you bring home from the store are still alive and respiring; the quick heat treatment tends to slow the rate at which they respire and produce ethylene, a gas that plays a crucial role in the ripening of many kinds of produce. In leafy greens, the shock of the hot water also seems to turn down production of enzymes that cause browning around wounded leaves, and to turn up the production of heat-shock proteins, which can have preservative effects.

For the home cook, the inner workings don’t really matter. The bottom line is that soaking your produce in hot water for a few minutes after you unpack it makes it cheaper and more nutritious because more fruits and veggies will end up in your family rather than in the trash.

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HEAT-SHOCKING GUIDELINES

The optimal time and temperature for heat-shocking fruits and vegetables varies in response to many factors – in particular, whether they were already treated before purchase. Use these as general guidelines.

– Asparagus: 2 to 3 minutes at 131 F (55 C)

– Broccoli: 7 to 8 minutes at 117 F (47 C)

– Cantaloupe (whole): 60 minutes at 122 F (50 C)

– Celery: 90 seconds at 122 F (50 C)

– Grapes: 8 minutes at 113 F (45 C)

– Kiwi fruit: 15 to 20 minutes at 104 F (40 C)

– Lettuce: 1 to 2 minutes at 122 F (50 C)

– Oranges (whole): 40 to 45 minutes at 113 F (45 C)

– Peaches (whole): 40 minutes at 104 F (40 C)

 

A shocking (and hot!) tip for preserving produce

Photo credit: AP Photo/Modernist Cuisine, LLC, Chris Hoover