Diego aka Diablo, aka Archie (Archimedes)

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You know we adopted another bunny last October at the House Rabbit Society Educators Conference in San Diego? We walked by an X pen, and were greeted but he fluffiest, friendliest black lop. We promised him if the airline let us bring him into the cabin, and San Diego House Rabbit Society could make the adoption in 48 hours, he was coming home with us. Stars were aligned, and next thing you know, we are flying home.

He was a good traveller, and the steward even gave him a bowl of greens.

 

 

 

Triangle Rabbits of North Carolina Now Stocking Bunny Biscotti

The smart bunnies of the Research Triangle did their research and decided they want Bunny Biscotti Hay Treats! Triangle Rabbits of central North Carolina now sells Bunny Biscotti at their events. They sold out at the first event before we even had a chance to post this.

We had to revise our labels to meet the North Carolina State Agriculture standards, so be on the look out for the new look as it rolls out. Below is the label for our treats with apples (Washington, of course!) and blueberries.

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They currently stock the Banana treats and the Apple with Blueberries treats.

Find Triangle Rabbits at  Facebook, MeetUp, and Twitter.

Website hacked

Nov 4, 2017

We apologize for the lack of new content, and some very old items. Our site was hacked and it has taken us a bit of time to slowly bring it all back. But find up to date info, and the latest pictures of our testing team on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We love Instagram–just bunnies and more bunnies (and a few vintage Mustangs).

 

Lady of the Litterbox

Even in her litterbox, she retains a glamourous look.
Even in her litterbox, she retains a glamorous look.

Our dear Violet, who aways had the most impeccable letterbox habits if the conditions were perfect (proper litter, grass under her feet, secluded but with a view out, to name a few) seems to be having difficulty getting into her box. She had the most graceful jump, whether it be from  rug to rug, into the litterbox, or from the windowsill over the fence into off limit areas. But her 11+ years is showing. Last night, she landed midway on the edge of the letterbox, so we pulled an old carrier bottom from storage. Its lower edge is perfect for her, and it is easy to clean.

New packaging for freshness and safety and good looks!

Resealable Bunny Biscotti stand up pouch
Resealable Bunny Biscotti stand up pouch

Bunfectionary introduced new packaging for Bunny Biscotti last year at the Midwest Bunfest. The new packaging comprises an outer layer of richly-textured green rice paper, a PET layer, a LLDPE layer, a ziplock closure and tear notch, and a horizontal window so that customers can see the product before purchase. The package also has a gusset that allows it to stand up, and a hold can be punched above the heat seal line for hanging.

The rice paper helps protect the colors of the fruits and herbs from UV fading and discoloration, as well giving the pouch a unique texture and appearance.

Each package is heat sealed for fresh, long-lasting flavor and safety, and carries a Guaranteed Analysis Label.

Here is how we have changed over the past years.

Georgia House Rabbit Society to carry Bunny Biscotti

We are so happy to announce that Georgia House Rabbit Society will be carrying Bunny Biscotti. We first came across them when they had issues with land zoning and their new shelter–and won! Now they are trying to renovate their shelter with the help of animalhouse.tv, which is a television show concept that will renovate or build animal shelters in struggling communities. GA HRS has been chosen to be one of the first six episodes of this reality concept show. “The show is modeled after the reality show “Extreme Makeover, Home Edition “and the plan is they will come in and give [the] Rabbit Center a much needed remodel, expansion and other perks,  however the most important thing is the National spotlight that will happen for rescued rabbits!”

Trio of testers

Lily feels no threat with her guardian siblings: legs out and facing the wall. Oddly enough, she is the most curious bunny I know, and always wants to see what is happening, what needs to be investigated. We also call her Busy Bunny or Pince  Nez because of the marking around her face.

Flower, Lily, and Buttercup
Flower, Lily, and Buttercup

Bunny Tarot Cards

If a new pack of tarot cards are in your future–and a good reader would know this, right?–then be sure to check out this very cute set of rabbit tarot cards available on Kickstarter.

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Of course, we all have a bun who thinks she is Queen of Carrots.

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But despite Maddie, our Dutch, we chose the Page of Daisies.

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Washing veggies in hot water helps preserve them?

I admit it: I am still trying to wrap my head around this. How can hot water help preserve the raw veggies on my bunnies’ plates? I hate seeing how much can go to waste if I have to feed the guys a lot more than usual (e.g., leaving the house for more than 18 hours). Lettuce wilts and sticks to the plate, the carrots get mushy, and the fennel browns and hardens. So it was exciting to find this idea at the Modernist Cuisine site.

Food scientists, however, have discovered a remarkably effective way to extend the life of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables by days or even a week. It doesn’t involve the chlorine solutions, irradiation or peroxide baths sometimes used by produce packagers. And it’s easily done in any home by anyone.

This method, called heat-shocking, is 100 percent organic and uses just one ingredient that every cook has handy – hot water.

You may already be familiar with a related technique called blanching, a cooking method in which food is briefly dunked in boiling or very hot water. Blanching can extend the shelf life of broccoli and other plant foods, and it effectively reduces contamination by germs on the surface of the food. But blanching usually ruptures the cell walls of plants, causing color and nutrients to leach out. It also robs delicate produce of its raw taste.

Heat-shocking works differently. When the water is warm but not scalding – temperatures ranging from 105 F to 140 F (about 40 C to 60 C) work well for most fruits and vegetables – a brief plunge won’t rupture the cells. Rather, the right amount of heat alters the biochemistry of the tissue in ways that, for many kinds of produce, firm the flesh, delay browning and fading, slow wilting, and increase mold resistance.

A long list of scientific studies published during the past 15 years report success using heat-shocking to firm potatoes, tomatoes, carrots, and strawberries; to preserve the color of asparagus, broccoli, green beans, kiwi fruits, celery, and lettuce; to fend off overripe flavors in cantaloupe and other melons; and to generally add to the longevity of grapes, plums, bean sprouts and peaches, among others.

The optimum time and temperature combination for the quick dip seems to depend on many factors, but the procedure is quite simple. Just let the water run from your tap until it gets hot, then fill a large pot of water about two-thirds full, and use a thermometer to measure the temperature. It will probably be between 105 F and 140 F; if not, a few minutes on the stove should do the trick. Submerge the produce and hold it there for several minutes (the hotter the water, the less time is needed), then drain, dry and refrigerate as you normally would.

Researchers still are working out the details of how heat-shocking works, but it appears to change the food in several ways at once. Many of the fruits and vegetables you bring home from the store are still alive and respiring; the quick heat treatment tends to slow the rate at which they respire and produce ethylene, a gas that plays a crucial role in the ripening of many kinds of produce. In leafy greens, the shock of the hot water also seems to turn down production of enzymes that cause browning around wounded leaves, and to turn up the production of heat-shock proteins, which can have preservative effects.

For the home cook, the inner workings don’t really matter. The bottom line is that soaking your produce in hot water for a few minutes after you unpack it makes it cheaper and more nutritious because more fruits and veggies will end up in your family rather than in the trash.

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HEAT-SHOCKING GUIDELINES

The optimal time and temperature for heat-shocking fruits and vegetables varies in response to many factors – in particular, whether they were already treated before purchase. Use these as general guidelines.

– Asparagus: 2 to 3 minutes at 131 F (55 C)

– Broccoli: 7 to 8 minutes at 117 F (47 C)

– Cantaloupe (whole): 60 minutes at 122 F (50 C)

– Celery: 90 seconds at 122 F (50 C)

– Grapes: 8 minutes at 113 F (45 C)

– Kiwi fruit: 15 to 20 minutes at 104 F (40 C)

– Lettuce: 1 to 2 minutes at 122 F (50 C)

– Oranges (whole): 40 to 45 minutes at 113 F (45 C)

– Peaches (whole): 40 minutes at 104 F (40 C)

 

A shocking (and hot!) tip for preserving produce

Photo credit: AP Photo/Modernist Cuisine, LLC, Chris Hoover

Survey on pets shows lack of research before buying

As anyone in the the pet rescue will tell you–especially rabbit rescues– there is little research done before bringing home a pet.

They’re lazy, and they’ll eat anything.

Those are two misconceptions about cats that pet food manufacturer Royal Canin USA Inc. discovered in a survey of cat owners.

A market research firm working on behalf of St. Charles, Mo.-based Royal Canin reported a number of revelations after questioning 541 cat owners:

• Nearly 50 percent brought their pet home without researching its lifestyle.

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Cats aren’t as lazy as their owners think, a Royal Canin survey discovered.

• 61 percent believed that cats adapt easily to the owner’s lifestyle.

• A majority of respondents were unaware that cats are active every day, marking territory, hunting and hiding.

• Half did not not think about their cat’shealth each day.

• 72 percent don’t consider their cat’s health when selecting pet food.

• 93 percent don’t factor in their cat’s breed when purchasing food.

• More than half ignored their cat’s age when making food decisions.

• 42 percent considered flavor to be important when choosing cat food.

• 15 percent admitted to taste-testing cat food.

“In truth, a cat’s ability to taste isn’t nearly as powerful as a human’s ability, and aroma and texture play a much bigger role in how cats choose their food,” said Brent Mayabb, DVM, director of corporate affairs at Royal Canin.

One of the best ways to enhance the bond with a cat is to learn more about felines, Mayabb said.

“Understanding a cat’s physical and physiological traits is critical to not only finding the right fit for your family but also in doing what’s best for the cat’s well-being once they are brought home,” he said.

Many cat owners aren’t sure which factors they should consider when buying food, Mayabb added.

“Feeding cats a food suited to their age, lifestyle, specific sensitivities and breed contributes to the overall health and well-being of the cat,” he noted.

More than 37 percent of U.S. households own a cat, according to the American Pet Products Association’s latest National Pet Ownership Survey.

 

See the original article here: