Lady of the Litterbox

Even in her litterbox, she retains a glamourous look.
Even in her litterbox, she retains a glamorous look.

Our dear Violet, who aways had the most impeccable letterbox habits if the conditions were perfect (proper litter, grass under her feet, secluded but with a view out, to name a few) seems to be having difficulty getting into her box. She had the most graceful jump, whether it be from  rug to rug, into the litterbox, or from the windowsill over the fence into off limit areas. But her 11+ years is showing. Last night, she landed midway on the edge of the letterbox, so we pulled an old carrier bottom from storage. Its lower edge is perfect for her, and it is easy to clean.

A makeover for bunny housing

When Rose, Lily, Buttercup, Flower, and Maddie joined the household, there was a major shift in the house layout. Rose gets along with everyone, but the trio (Lily, Buttercup, Flower) do not care for Maddie, especially the sister Lily and Flower. So we had to use the X-pens to accommodate everyone.

Here are some before and after pictures. RIP living room.

 

Living room before the bunnies took over
Living room before the bunnies took over
Living room after the bunnies took over with carpet squares and floor mats
Living room after the bunnies took over with carpet squares and floor mats

 

Violet guards the gate to make sure no one escapes and invades her kingdom
Violet guards the gate to make sure no one escapes and invades her kingdom

 

Survey on pets shows lack of research before buying

As anyone in the the pet rescue will tell you–especially rabbit rescues– there is little research done before bringing home a pet.

They’re lazy, and they’ll eat anything.

Those are two misconceptions about cats that pet food manufacturer Royal Canin USA Inc. discovered in a survey of cat owners.

A market research firm working on behalf of St. Charles, Mo.-based Royal Canin reported a number of revelations after questioning 541 cat owners:

• Nearly 50 percent brought their pet home without researching its lifestyle.

 Cat
Cats aren’t as lazy as their owners think, a Royal Canin survey discovered.

• 61 percent believed that cats adapt easily to the owner’s lifestyle.

• A majority of respondents were unaware that cats are active every day, marking territory, hunting and hiding.

• Half did not not think about their cat’shealth each day.

• 72 percent don’t consider their cat’s health when selecting pet food.

• 93 percent don’t factor in their cat’s breed when purchasing food.

• More than half ignored their cat’s age when making food decisions.

• 42 percent considered flavor to be important when choosing cat food.

• 15 percent admitted to taste-testing cat food.

“In truth, a cat’s ability to taste isn’t nearly as powerful as a human’s ability, and aroma and texture play a much bigger role in how cats choose their food,” said Brent Mayabb, DVM, director of corporate affairs at Royal Canin.

One of the best ways to enhance the bond with a cat is to learn more about felines, Mayabb said.

“Understanding a cat’s physical and physiological traits is critical to not only finding the right fit for your family but also in doing what’s best for the cat’s well-being once they are brought home,” he said.

Many cat owners aren’t sure which factors they should consider when buying food, Mayabb added.

“Feeding cats a food suited to their age, lifestyle, specific sensitivities and breed contributes to the overall health and well-being of the cat,” he noted.

More than 37 percent of U.S. households own a cat, according to the American Pet Products Association’s latest National Pet Ownership Survey.

 

See the original article here:

Rhubarb

Tilbert is named for Seattle Tilth, a once great organization that used to simply promote urban gardening and stewardship. Unfortunately, its priorities shifted as it decided to “grow its mission”, and now it has joined the hipster bandwagon of promoting the raising of animals in your yard as meat. And of course, this includes rabbits because some whack job convinced them that rabbits are low cost and low maintenance, needing just leftovers from a garden. No mention of hay, sociability, companionship, or the fact that many domesticated rabbits can’t survive outside.

Needless to say, we stopped our donations not only to the ST, but to the radio show that featured their outreach member.

But one of the good things we learned from them is that one of the best fertilizers is rabbit poop. It not only can go into the compost bin, but it can actually be spread directly on plants. And guess what plant loves bunny poop? Rhubarb.

So we planted a few plants on our roof deck, and fertilize all year with stray pellets. When Food 52 came produced this group of recipes, we had to share it.

In particular, these two caught our eyes.

Rhubarb and Rose Ramos Gin Fizz

Serves 1

  • 2 ounces London dry gin
  • 1/2 ounce lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce lime juice
  • 2 ounces rhubarb syrup
  • 1 ounce heavy cream
  • 1 or 2 drops rosewater
  • 1 egg white
  • ice
  • soda water
  1. Combine all ingredients except ice and soda in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 30 seconds. Then add ice to shaker and shake a further 30 seconds. Strain into a tall chilled glass and top up with soda.
  2. To make rhubarb syrup, cut a pound of rhubarb stalks into one-inch pieces, wrap them in cheesecloth, and simmer for a half hour in 2 C water and 1 C sugar. Strain into a glass container with a lid and refrigerate.

food52_06-12-12-6049

Naughty Rhubarb Scones

Serves 12-16 scones

  • 3 stalks rhubarb
  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup vanilla sugar
  • 2/3–3/4 cups heavy cream
  1. Preheat oven to 425.
  2. Slice rhubarb stalks 1/4 ” thick. Toss with 3 tablespoons of the sugar.
  3. Sift flour, baking powder and salt together in large bowl or bowl of food processor.
  4. Cut butter into flour mixture by hand (or whiz with food processor) until butter is the size of small peas.
  5. Blend in 1/4 cup of the sugar.
  6. Blend in sliced rhubarb. (If using the food processor, just pulse — you want the slices left mostly intact.)
  7. Blend in cream until a soft dough forms. (note: you may need to add more than 2/3 cup depending on the weather,etc.)
  8. Transfer dough to floured surface and divide in half. To make triangular scones, flatten into 6-inch disks and cut each circle into 6-8 scones. Sprinkle with remaining sugar.
  9. Arrange on ungreased cookie sheet and bake about 20 minutes or until reddish-brown on top.

food52_05-22-12-2-50

 

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